Kenya’s Priority Issue: To Drink or Google WATER (Laptops)

0 22

Floods in KenyaA woman in Western province has become a Kenyan conversation because of her yearly appeal to what she calls Serikali. It seems that every year her home is taken by the water! The interesting thing is that she rebuilds on the same land near the river (much like my neighbors in Florida after a hurricane). Then in Magina, Kiambu County, 3 children were buried arrive when their house was covered by a mud – slide. I went to see the place and to cry with those who are crying. What I found is a neighborhood on top of a slope. This place has no trees and is predictably dangerous. “They have no other place to go. This is their only home.” A neighbor told me. “The government must provide them with shelter.”

 

This is the story in many parts of Kenya. Every rainy season, the storms come sweeping away roads, homes, and bridges. I have seen bridges swept away and roads covered with rocks. The people cry, “Serikali itusaidie”. People stand on the side of the river watching as it runs with the bridge and water for the dry season.

 

- Advertisement -

The other day, I visited a family at a Nairobi apartment complex. “We get water once a week to fill our tanks.” They told me. It is so bad that many times they do not flush their toilets to conserve water. Of-course they are calling on Serikali to help them.

 

After the rainy season, there will be draught in Kenya. I figured that all the water flowing down the valley goes somewhere. It goes to some place where someone can tap it. It could be used to establish water security in the country. But not in Kenya!  You see, the serikali has other priorities apart from water: laptops for all standard one children joining class one next year. Who needs drinking water when you can Google WATER online?

 

Teddy Njoroge Kamau (PhD), SYR  Radio/TV, Director, International Desk. Diaspora Messenger Contributor

Comment on the article

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. AcceptRead More

%d bloggers like this: