ANOTHER KENYAN DIES IN MARYLAND

UPDATE

There will be a meeting after the memorial service at:
 
Time-7.00PM
 
Venue-Sarki’s Restaurant.
7670 Hawthone Rd
La Plata Md
20646
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Memorial Service will be held on Tuesday, 2/2/2010 from 5-7pm (With service beginning at 7pm) at:Thornton Funeral Home Chapel 3439 Livingston Road Indian Head, Maryland 20640 -The Body will leave for Kenya on Wednesday 3rd Feb.
******************

Pastor Mungai,King’s father arrived today from Kenya and is being hosted by a Kenyan family in Waldorf Maryland. Tomorrow, Saturday the 30th he will attend a Kenyans fellowship meeting in Silver Spring at Samuel Kibe’s residence, 1217 Windmill lane, Silver Spring Maryland 20905.He will attend Sunday service at DFI Church on Sunday February 31st. Those in the Washington Metro area are requested to come and encourage pastor Mungai who has been shaken by the loss of his only son. The body leaves on Wednesday 3rd February for Kenya so pastor Mungai will only be in the US for few days. Those who wish to talk to him can call him on 240 412 5020.

ANOTHER KENYAN DIES IN MARYLAND
By Diasporamessenger
01/28/2010
The late King Wilson Mungai
 
 
 
The hand of death has snatched another young man in Maryland. Mr. King Wilson Mungai, 25 years old of La plata Maryland, U.S.A died in a road accident which occurred on Fri. January 22, 2010 .According his best friend James Mwangi of Alabama, who has received a police report on the accident, King was making a left turn when a truck coming from another direction crashed on his car. He was taken to the hospital in a coma and never recovered. He died later as the doctors tried to revive him.
 
 
 
 
 
King came to the US in 2002 and lived in North Carolina until 2006 when he moved to Maryland. He was husband to Joyce Wilson-Mungai of La Plata, MD, beloved first and only son of Rev. Pastor Samuel Mungai & Rose Bella Mungai of Naivasha in Kenya. Brother to Sharon Mungai & Purity Wanjiku, Uncle to Beatrice Lewa, all of Kenya.
 
 
 
Memorial Service will be held on Tuesday, 2/2/2010 from 5-7pm (With service beginning at 7pm) at:Thornton Funeral Home Chapel

3439 Livingston Road Indian Head, Maryland 20640 Rev. Lowell H. Hancock, Officiating
Date: Tuesday, 2/2/2010
 
The family needs prayers and financial assistance. Contributions may be deposited to

Name: Joyce Wilson Mungai/ King Wilson Mungai
Bank: B B & T
Account #: 0005156120539
Routing #: 055003308
 
 
 
 
We are living in a global community and King’s marriage happens to be a cross cultural marriage. For us Kenyans living in the US, it is customary to send monetary gifts to the family. For Americans, it is more customary to send cards and flowers. Cards may be sent to Joyce Wilson-Mungai at 111 Mallard Lane, La Plata, MD 20646. Flowers may be sent to the Funeral Home at Thornton Funeral Home, P.A. 3439 Livingston Road, Indian Head, MD 20640. Phone number (301) 375-7855.
 
 
 
For those Kenyans who would like to make donations, monetary contributions may be sent to:
 
 
-Dorcas Marekia: 404-944-5017 [email protected]yahoo.com Georgia
 
-Lillian Njoroge (Iddie): 832-455-9639 [email protected] Texas
 
-Timona: 612-217-3115 [email protected] Minnesota
 
-Michael Wanjogo: 616-589-3057 [email protected] Michigan
 
-James Mwangi: 205-916-0009 [email protected] Alabama
 
-Purity Wanjiku Mungai 254-721-558-167 Kenya
 
 
 
 
 
Details for the funeral will be communicated later, for further information please contact:
James Mwangi 205-916-0009
Dorcas Marekia 404-944-5017


 
THOSE WHO COME FROM NAIVASHA AREA ARE KINDLY REQUESTED TO CONTACT JAMES MWANGI ON 205 916 0009 OR EMAIL [email protected] TO HELP COORDINATE KING’S FATHER, PASTOR SAMUEL MUNGAI’S ACCOMMODATION AS HE ARRIVES ON 01/29/2010 FROM KENYA.THANK YOU
 
********************************************
 

Message from Pastor Joseph Macharia
Dear Friends, Brother and Sisters,
I Greet you all in Jesus Name , I got this sad news Email below from My friend Pastor Samuel Mungai from Naivasha Kenya that His only son died in tragic Car accident in Maryland , I Called him we prayed together I gave him the words of comfort. His heart is so heavy and his spirit is too low .You can imagine his only son ,He is in an urgent need for the money to be able to transport the body to Kenya .I Met Pastor Sam Mungai in the year 2005 Here in Phoenix he come to our Church gave him the alter where he preached a powerful message when our Church was on 15th avenue. Some of you might remember him.
I am suggesting that for those who are willing to donate either by prayer or financial wise, we meet on Tuesday at our home in Gilbert Address 6229 south Moccasin Trail Zip 85298 So that we pray together and Give as Lord will enable you. whatever we will raise we will sent to him on Wednesday .This news came when we are burdened by the Holy spirit to pray for our people to stop the spirit of death in Diaspora ,Our families and friends did not sent us abroad to return in the coffin .Big no !!!! We shall live to see the children of our children children and to declare the goodness of God .Please reply as soon as you get this email so that I know the number of those who will make it .I saved his Cell for privacy purpose and at this time let us uplift him before God.
Pst Joseph Macharia
CELL 602-299-4210
OR 480-393-0727
Pst Joseph Macharia
***************************************************************************8
My Son King was involved in a terrible accident and He Died in Maryland and I have come to take his Body back to Kenya please pray for me to be able to do this.
 
I am in Maryland now and you can call my cell 240-412-5020
 
Rev Sam

AN ESSAY BY THE LATE KING WILSON MUNGAI WHO DIED ON 22ND JANUARY 2010.IT WAS READ AT HIS MEMORIAL SERVICE ON 2/2/2010 BY REV,TURNER COGGINS JR. OF CHRISTIAN FAMILY BAPTIST CHURCH IN LAPLATA MARYLAND.
 
King W. Mungai
ENG 111-10
Jan 30th, 2006
Remembered Event Essay
THIRTY BELOW ON TOP OF A 58 FOOT SEMI TRUCK
More than just hardening my muscle, nothing could be as rewarding to my soul. We all have our “good-ugly” memories. There are some that make us stand shoulders high to talk about. Not because we loved the pain so bad, but because we haven’t met the side of us that says, I will stand through it all. We really were not familiar with the “little further pusher” and “what is the worst that could happen when it already has”. Nothing could stretch it for me than the fierce deadly freezing Tuesday morning February, 15th of 2005.
I was in the Blaine, Minnesota at the local Menards lumber yard by five in the morning. My Toyota Camry never got to keep me warm until I got to Blaine. It was a big struggle in trying to get a grip on my steering wheel. My thick miserable fingers were curled in the palm of my hands and not willing to unfold. My toes clung so fast to each other. I felt like a leper. But yet, this was still nothing compared to what was ahead for me.
This day, we did not use regular 11,000 pound Isuzu appliance delivery truck. We were set for the big stuff. It was major construction materials delivery day. My boss Doug was still in the store’s nicely heated delivery department office. He really took his time getting the daily customer invoices. He already had the fifty eight foot ugly roaring fright liner truck wide awake. The driver’s cage was not going to shelter me from the horrible weather condition. The foul-mouth Matt couldn’t wait to see me squirm. He kept demanding that I do this after that without a sincere need for my help. I wondered if he would feast on my flesh if I dropped dead at his feet.
Matt and the other two forklift loaders were wearing heavy duty layers of clothing. They had their hoods on plus masks that covered their whole face but for their eyes. Good company gloves kept their hands nicely warm. On top of that, these kids were born and raised in the deadly Minnesota cold. Poor King had a pair of Hanes polyester under suit bought from Wal-Mart; with a light pair of jeans, sweat shirt, a head band, and a Columbia sportswear jacket, my world was still under attack. Now I was twenty three feet high off the ground, squatting on piles of sheet rock laid on the flatbed.
The cold icy wind was cutting 20 miles an hour. That even made it worse. The cold was so hungry and it embraced the air so intensely. I felt it break through my bones. My ears were ready to fall off my head; my dry, flaky, chapped winter lips chattered. My teeth gnashed. My entire body went in to a tremendous shiver that kept rolling and rolling. My joints went so stiff; and neither could my wrist twist nor my neck turn. I could neither spring up nor sit down. My rear end felt like it wasn’t there. Cold hell was breaking loose on me. The Minnesota beast felt like it was on a mission to devour one very harmless skinned rat.
The unbearable cold sent my mind across continents. The thoughts landed me in the sunny and tropical ever-constant hundred degree temperature of Mombasa, Kenya. I envisioned myself in beige muscle shirt, khaki shorts and barefoot walking through my front gate towards the beach ten minutes away. The wretched cold snapped my mind right back to the semi truck; my thoughts rushed at me rapidly. Never in my life had I thought I would be working under such horrible conditions. I asked my self a thousand questions. “What is the purpose of this challenge?” “Why am I here?” “Is this the road to success?” Twenty dollars a day and I tried to put it all into perspective. “Can it get better for me?” I thought of my parents and my sisters and how they would have felt if they saw what I had to go through. I know they would have been sad. My mom would have probably demanded that I catch the next flight available flight home. I became emotional and wanted to cry; real men do cry.
I look back on this one of many bust memorable life-changing events. Learning to live with and in the sub-freezing temperatures helped shape me into a more focused and resilient individual. It has allowed me to stay committed to my goals no matter what it takes. I now find myself taking a more proactive and assertive role, never taking no for an answer. More than ever before, I am now prepared and know what it takes to persevere and succeed in an unfamiliar climate. I have learned to see challenges as opportunities in disguise.
 

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